Rockstar Games has finally done the thing that pretty much everyone wanted them to do: announce Red Dead Redemption 2. The game will receive its first trailer tomorrow morning, but until then, gamers have many questions about what Red Dead 2 will feature and what it won’t.

With the ever growing presence of online features in games, I believe there are a number of things that could get in the way of Red Dead 2 being successful. Without further adieu, here are four features you will hate should they crop up in Red Dead Redemption 2.

First off is the concept of “always online.” This is something we see somewhat frequently in video games these days. Typically, always online comes up for multiplayer-only games, but open-world games aren’t sacred either. Always online obviously has its role for multiplayer only games, but not all open-world games need it.

Experiences like Tom Clancy’s The Division required gamers to be online. Its massive open-world was a playground for folks to bounce around with their friends in. However, it wasn’t the ideal experience for gamers who enjoy single player.

Single player vs. multiplayer feels like it has become a bigger discussion this generation. What do gamers want more of? Well, that seems to be on a per-game basis. I can firmly say, however, that if Red Dead Redemption was an always online experience, that will piss off gamers to no end because the original never was.

Going hand-in-hand with that is the co-op style campaign. Again, this is something we’ve seen quite a bit more of this generation, but it would not fit with Red Dead. The first game’s campaign was a single player experience. There’s not reason why Red Dead Redemption 2‘s campaign shouldn’t be single player as well.

Co-op is a great concept for a game, but there are some experiences that shouldn’t be co-op. You can have that idea of a living world with players populating it, but Rockstar needs to keep it out of our single player campaign. Keep co-op in Red Dead Online.

Moving in a similar step, the third thing that could royally piss of gamers is if Red Dead Online was bolstered at the expense of its campaign. Millions of people pick up a game like Red Dead or GTA because of the single player. It would be a true surprise to see Rockstar deliver a subpar campaign, given the history they have of creating incredible single player narratives.

I get the strong feeling that Red Dead Online is going to play a major role in Red Dead Redemption 2. How could it not be with the success of GTA Online? It would be thoughtless of Rockstar not to at least try and incorporate a similar concept into Red Dead 2.

It would be a surprise to see Rockstar Games not launch Red Dead Online when the game itself debuts. With GTA VGTA Online didn’t open-up until several months after the game was released. Since GTA V was launched on last-generation platforms and it was the first time Rockstar Games had done something like that, I’d expect the whole package to be ready at launch.

Games that heavily feature microtransactions are still sort of common these day. I wouldn’t put it passed any games publisher to feature microtransactions, not even Rockstar Games. Microtransactions can be mute points in video games, so long as they are not restrictive or “pay-to-win.” Rockstar would be crazy to tinker with “pay-to-win” microtransactions in Red Dead 2.

Besides, Red Dead Redemption 2 will generate enough revenue from players purchasing the game that Rockstar doesn’t need to try and make a quick buck off of early adopters. Rockstar Games will release Red Dead Redemption 2‘s first trailer tomorrow morning at 11 a.m. EST.

Red Dead Redemption 2 will launch sometime during 2017 and the game will arrive on PS4 and Xbox One. Stick around here at We Write Things for more on Red Dead Redemption 2.

About Steve Ruygrok

Gaming, Spirits, and Craft Beer enthusiast. If you say you don't like beer, then you just haven't had the right type yet. Great spirits keep away the bad ones. Video games are kind of amazing, just do it...or something like that.
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